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Australian vegetable exports on the rise

Peak body says certain considerations make it difficult to measure export growth against fruit sector

Ausveg, the peak representative body for Australian vegetable and potato growers, says the progress its members have made in growing exports over recent years should not be overshadowed by comparisons with the value of Australian fruit exports.

Global Trade Atlas data has shown the value of Australian vegetable exports grew 2 per cent to A$252m in 2017.

Ausveg believes the industry is well placed to meet its goal of growing export revenue to A$315m by 2020.

While it might seem easy to assess the performance of vegetable exports against fruit exports, Ausveg’s national manager – export development, Michael Coote, said there were certain considerations that made this comparison problematic.

“Fruits are a higher value export group than vegetables as they are more seasonal commodities and can command higher prices from importing countries during their seasonal windows,” Coote explained.

“Vegetables, on the other hand, are a more consistent annual product group and tend to fill gaps in regions that are not so lucky to have year-round vegetable production like we do with most vegetable commodities in Australia.”

Coote said market access was another contributing factor.

“A number of different Australian fruits have had success growing their export trade into China, while Australia does not yet have access into this market for most vegetable commodities,” he explained.

“Despite these challenges, the industry has increased its focus on boosting the value and volume of its vegetable exports, with work being undertaken by Ausveg, Hort Innovation and other groups in building the exporting skills of Australian growers and providing opportunities to build relationships with foreign buyers.”

Carrots were Australia's best performing vegetable export in 2017, with shipments totalling 110,000 tonnes at a value of A$91m.

Together with onions and potatoes, carrots currently account for over 60 per cent of total Australian vegetable exports by value and over 80 per cent of vegetable exports by volume.

“The Australian vegetable industry is experiencing solid growth in its exports, particularly on the back of strong performing products such as carrots and broccoli to the Middle East and Asia,” Coote said.

“The industry is well on its way to reach the ambitious target of A$315m in fresh vegetable exports by 2020 as outlined by the industry’s export strategy. We are working with growers to ensure they have the skills and knowhow to improve their ability to export their produce and capitalise on increasing demand for fresh, Australian-grown vegetable produce.”

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Matthew Jones

Australian onions on export expansion path

Developing new avenues for international trade is a priority for Australian onion growers and marketers
ustralia’s onion industry is working on a five-year export market development plan, with Asia and the Middle East key targets.

The move comes amid incidents of oversupply in the domestic market and a steady decline in shipments to Europe.

“Through an industry funded project, we will conduct in-market trade research in high prospect markets to identify opportunities for product differentiation or customisation,” explained Peter Shadbolt, chairman of peak industry body Onions Australia.

“We will also support exporters to build capability and capacity to understand and service the emerging markets of Asia and the Middle East and look to collaborate more with the vegetable industry on in-bound and out-bound trade missions and trade shows.”

Shadbolt said Australia had a “seasonal advantage” over northern hemisphere suppliers when it came to servicing Asia and the Middle East, hence the reason why these have been identified as target markets by the Australian industry.

He said long-term prospects look particularly good for Australian onions in Singapore, Malaysia, Japan, Qatar and Bahrain, although this is heavily dependent on the Australian dollar staying within the “current favourable range.”

Due to high production and export costs, the onion industry, like many of its Australian counterparts, knows it can only be competitive in niche markets where a segment is prepared to pay a premium, based on product integrity and a seasonal window advantage.

Therefore, to ensure a viable long-term export avenue is created, the work being done on the export market development plan will help prepare the industry for a time when exchange rates may be less favourable.

“The industry must work on reducing costs at every level of the supply chain by whatever means possible, while at the same time developing differentiated products that suit the needs of a niche market segment in a particular export market, for which they are prepared to pay a premium,” Shadbolt added.

“If Australia is to compete in the longer term, it must look to develop products customised to the opportunities in niche markets through variety selection, growing methods, quality specifications or packaging.”

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit Author: Matthew Jones

Horticulture production rises remain on track, according to quarterly figures

Figures released for the December quarter have confirmed that the gross value of horticultural production remains on track to pass $10billion dollars in 2018.

The Agricultural commodities report released by ABARES has estimated production across the major fruit and vegetable categories will continue its upward trend in terms of value increasing from $9.99billion to nearly $10.3billion in the 2017-18 financial year. Both vegetables and fruit and nuts are on track to be worth $4.1billion each, while table and dried grapes are set to increase from $364million to $374million.

This comes on the back of an increase in production which is forecast across the major categories. Potatoes are expected to rise from 1,295 kilotonnes (kt) to 1,385 kt, and onions are set to rise by 22 kt this financial year, and tomatoes 11 kt. In terms of fruit, bananas will rise by 28 kt according to the ABARES data, and oranges will be up from 395 to 418 kt. However, some produce lines are tipped to reduce slightly, including apples which will fall by just 2 kt, while carrot production will decrease by 4 kt.

Horticulture exports are tipped for another major rise in value, jumping from $2.5billion to $3.1billion. According to ABARES fruit exports should increase in value from $1billion in 2016-17 to more than $1.3billion in 2017-18, while tree nut exports look set for a rise of $310million. Vegetable exports will also rise, but by a much smaller margin of just $10million.

The increase in exports will continue to be led by the Chinese market, with the value continuing to increase from $260million to $341million in the next financial year. Fruit exports into the country are expected to again rise dramatically from $187million to $258million. Tree nuts and vegetables will also have slight increases in value.

The value of exports into Indonesia looks set to fall in this financial year by just over $13million. It is a similar story for the United States, with a significant drop in the value of tree nuts from $82.1million to $43.3million leading to an overall decrease of Australian horticultural produce into the country. However strong exports across all three categories (fruit, nuts and vegetables) means the value of exports to is Japan expected to rise from $178million $212million.

The full report can be viewed here

Publication date: 12/12/2017
Author: Matthew Russell
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com

Australia: Queensland fresh produce on show in Taiwan

Six Queensland producers from Australia’s Murray Darling Basin will be showcasing their produce as part of the ‘Now in Season’ campaign in Taiwan.

In a release, state Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) senior industry development officer Justin Heaven said this was an opportunity for producers to build consumer awareness and demand for Queensland vegetables.

“Producers will be selling their high quality produce through several CitySuper stores in Taiwan over 10 days, culminating with a showcase event on 14 June 2017,” Heaven said.

“This will include a range of in-store promotions, tastings and other networking activities designed to build the presence of Queensland fresh produce.

“The produce that will be showcased includes broccoli, cauliflower, onions, red cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery, baby leaf products and fresh juice.”

He said growers would also meet with importers, distributors and retail partners to discuss export opportunities.

Heaven said Taiwan had been highlighted as a potential growth market with the total value of fresh produce imported into Taiwan reaching US$295.4 million in 2016, up from US$135.6 million the previous year.

“The Taiwan market does have strict import protocols and regulatory requirements in place, so producers considering trading with Taiwan should investigate the market requirements thoroughly,” he said.

The ‘Now In Season’ campaign is a multi-industry, multi-country integrated promotional program designed to raise awareness of the advantages of quality, safe and healthy Australian horticulture products.

Heaven leads a project that supports irrigators to develop new, high value, export oriented horticulture industries in the Queensland Murray Darling Basin to increase economic activity and employment is areas affected by irrigation water buy-backs under the Murray Darling Basin plan.

www.freshfruitportal.com

Image: Pixabay_b1-photo

‘Now in Season’ heads to Taiwan

Queensland vegetables take centre stage in 10-day promotional programme

Queensland-grown broccoli, cauliflower and onions are among the fresh products being showcased in Taiwan this week as part of the ‘Now in Season’ campaign.

The 10-day promotion is being run through several CitySuper stores, with the centrepiece of the campaign being an exhibition event tomorrow (14 June).

“This will include a range of in-store promotions, tastings and other networking activities designed to build the presence of Queensland fresh produce,” said Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) senior industry development officer, Justin Heaven.

“The produce that will be showcased includes broccoli, cauliflower, onions, red cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery, baby leaf products and fresh juice. Producers will also to meet with importers, distributers and retail partners to discuss exporting opportunities.”

Taiwan has been highlighted as a potential growth market for Queensland's vegetable trade, with the value of overall fresh produce imports into Taiwan reaching A$295m (US$223m) in 2016, up from A$135,586,000 (US$103m) in 2015. Having said this, Heaven explained it was important for potential exporters to do their due diligence.

“The Taiwan market does have strict import protocols and regulatory requirements in place, so producers considering trading with Taiwan should investigate the market requirements thoroughly,” he said.

The ‘Now In Season’ campaign is a multi-industry promotional programme designed to raise awareness of the advantages of quality, safe and healthy Australian horticulture products.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit Author: Matthew Jones

Image: Pixabay_congerdesign