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New Zealand - Spotlight on quality avocado to Australia

Jen Scoular:

Normally there is a collective sigh of relief as NZ finishes an avocado export season but this year it's a different story. They experienced significant quality issues post-November, especially for their avocados going into the Australian market.

NZ harvests avocados five months of the year for export markets, and aim to harvest just in time to be cooled and packed, loaded on to the appropriate vessel, arrive in Australia to be cleared, trucked to the distribution centre or wholesale market and be available to customer orders.

Avocados are unlike kiwifruit and apples where they are all harvested at once, then coolstored until the market is ready. The tree is the coolstore, and post-harvest needs to be as speedy as possible.

Another challenge is that the New Zealand growing season is cooler and wetter than growing seasons in Western Australia, Chile, Peru and Mexico — who are NZ competitors.

 Source: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12210443 

Australia scores improved citrus, carrot access to Indonesia with signed FTA

Australia’s National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) has welcomed the recently signed free trade agreement with Indonesia, which will give improved market access for a range of agricultural products including carrots and citrus.

It said “wide-ranging wins” for farmers were at the heart of the much much-anticipated Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA), signed in Indonesia on March 4.

“Today represents real tangible benefits to the hip pocket of many Australian farmers,” said National Farmers’ Federation CEO Tony Maharsaid. “IA-CEPA will deliver improved market access for live cattle, feed grains, beef, sheepmeat, dairy, sugar, fruit, carrots, potatoes and honey.”

The tariff relief represents an extra AUD$5-10 million to Australia’s fresh vegetable exports per annum, Mahar said.

Carrots, Australia’s largest vegetable export, are at the forefront of the agreement with tariffs to be cut to 10% (down from 25%) for 5000 metric tons (MT) per year, increasing to 10,000MT after 10 years, and tariffs eliminated after 15 years.

There will also be improved access for key Australian citrus exports.

For mandarins, the tariff will be cut immediately to 10% (from 25%) for 7,500MT per year and reduced over time down to 0% after 20 years for an unlimited volume.

For oranges, there will be duty-free access for 10,000MT, increasing 5% each year, while for lemons and limes here will be duty-free access for 5,000MT, increasing 2.5% each year

Tariffs on potatoes will be cut immediately to 10% (from 25%) for 10,000MT per year, and after five years tariff further reduced to 5% for 12,500MT per year.

Source: https://www.freshfruitportal.com 

Australia, Indonesia sign FTA

Scheduled signing of trade agreement expected to end months-long period of uncertainty for exporters

Australian trade minister, Simon Birmingham met with Enggartiasto Lukita, trade minister for Indonesia and signed a highly anticipated free trade agreement (FTA).

The deal was planned to be signed before the end of 2018, however, tensions surrounding the location of Australia’s embassy in Israel rattled the leaders’ relationship.

Thankfully, today the agreement was signed opening up opportunity to Australian horticulture.

“Our farmers will export more produce because of this deal,” Australian minister for agriculture, David Littleproud said. “Preferential deals will be put in place or duty will be removed for more than 99 per cent of exports to Indonesia,” he added.

Citrus and vegetables are reportedly sectors that will benefit, and Ausveg national manager, Michael Coote told ABC News the agreement could have Australia’s major carrot and potato growers back on Indonesia’s supermarket shelves “almost immediately”.

“Indonesia is a major trading partner close to our shores, so there are benefits in terms of reduced freight times.

“Having access back into this market that is so close, has such a large population and does have an appetite for Australian produce is a real boom for the vegetable industry,” he said.

Littleproud said improved duty-free quotas will be in place for citrus and other horticultural products.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit 

Author: Camellia Aebischer 

Plant Biosecurity Advice 2019-P03 - Release of the draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh avocado fruit from Chile

28 February 2019

This Biosecurity Advice notifies stakeholders of the release of the draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh avocado fruit from Chile.

The draft report proposes that importation of fresh avocado fruit from all commercial production areas of Chile be permitted, subject to a range of biosecurity requirements.

The department has now published the draft report for a 60 calendar day public consultation period, closing on 29 April 2019.

Stakeholders are invited to have their say on the draft report. The department will consider all stakeholder comments received during the consultation period in preparing a final report.

The department announced the commencement of this risk analysis on 23 March 2018, via Biosecurity Advice 2018-05, advising it would be progressed as a review of biosecurity import requirements.

The draft report identifies seven quarantine pests associated with fresh avocado fruit from Chile that require risk management measures to reduce the biosecurity risk to an acceptable level. The quarantine pests identified are:

  • Fruit flies: Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata)
  • Mealybugs: grape mealybug (Pseudococcus maritimus)
  • Thrips: Chilean flower thrips (Frankliniella australis), tamarugo thrips (Frankliniella gemina) and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis)
  • Mites: avocado brown mite (Oligonychus punicae) and avocado red mite (Oligonychus yothersi).

 

  • The draft report proposes risk management measures, in combination with operational systems, to reduce the risks posed by the seven quarantine pests so as to achieve the appropriate level of protection for Australia. These measures include:
  • area freedom, fruit treatment (such as cold disinfestation treatment) or hard condition of fruit (for the Hass cultivar only) for Mediterranean fruit fly
  • consignment freedom verified by pre-export visual inspection and, if detected, remedial action for grape mealybug, Oligonychus spider mites and thrips
  • The draft report and more information about this risk analysis are available on the department’s website. Printed copies of the report are available on request.

The department invites stakeholders interested in receiving information and updates on biosecurity risk analyses to subscribe via the department’s online subscription service. By subscribing to Biosecurity Risk Analysis Plant, you will receive Biosecurity Advices and other notifications relating to plant biosecurity policy, including this risk analysis.

Dr Marion Healy
First Assistant Secretary
Biosecurity Plant Division

Source: http://www.agriculture.gov.au/biosecurity 

 

Agriculture a winner of Indonesia trade deal

The Hon David Littleproud MP
Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources


Monday 4 March 2019

• Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement signed today
• Increases livestock, beef and sheep meat, grains, sugar, dairy and citrus exports
• Builds on the long-standing trading relationship Australia shares with Indonesia

Australian farmers are big winners in the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) which was signed today.

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources David Littleproud said once in force the deal would help farmers sell more product.

“Our farmers will export more produce because of this deal,” Minister Littleproud said.

“We’re giving our farmers more options and creating competition for Australian produce.

“Beef and sheep farmers are big winners – tariffs will disappear and more cattle will be exported.

“All tariffs on beef and sheep meat will be eliminated over five years with most eliminated immediately. At the moment they sit at 5 per cent.

“The first 575,000 head of live male cattle are now duty free, growing to 700,000 over six years.

“Sugar tariffs will be slashed from a maximum 12 per cent to 5 per cent.

“The first 500,000 tonnes of grain per year will also be duty free and that will grow by 5 per cent a year.

“Improved duty free quotas will also be put in place for citrus and horticultural products.

“Also we’re increasing work and holiday visas for Indonesians from 1000 to 5000 which makes a big difference for producers who need seasonal workers.

“Preferential deals will be put in place or duty will be removed for more than 99 per cent of exports to Indonesia.

“Since coming to government, the Coalition has delivered six major free trade agreements.

“These are key to realising our ambition of a $100 billion agricultural industry by 2030.

“It will help boost farm gate prices, driving regional growth and jobs.”

Source: http://minister.agriculture.gov.au/littleproud/Pages/Media-Releases/Agriculture-a-winner-of-Indonesia-trade-deal.aspx 

 

Australia to boost Vietnam trade ties through table grapes

Việt Nam is a potential market for Australian table grapes because of its growing middle class, rapid economic growth and the increasing purchasing power of Vietnamese consumers.

The statement was made by Yvonne Chan, Australian Deputy Consul-General and Senior Trade Commissioner to Việt Nam, at a seminar in Hà Nội on Thursday.

The event was organised to cement existing trade relations and build new partnerships among Australian table grape exporters and Vietnamese importers.

Table grapes are produced in all Australian states, with the majority grown in Victoria. Of the country’s roughly 1,000 table grape growers, most are small-scale, family owned businesses.

Australia plants an average volume of 170,000 tonnes of table grapes each year, 62 per cent of which is exported to 42 countries and territories, Chan said.

Việt Nam is the 7th largest importer of Australian table grapes with a 4 per cent share, following China (38 per cent), Indonesia (15 per cent), Japan (10 per cent), Hong Kong (7 per cent), the Philippines (5 per cent) and Thailand (5 per cent).

According to Dianne Phan, trade head of Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited, Việt Nam is a key export market for Australia, and the Australian table grape industry has worked hard to introduce Vietnamese consumers of Australian grapes.

“Over the past four years, Australian table grape exports have grown 73 per cent, demonstrating the increasing demand for our high quality and premium produce,” she said.

Australian Table Grapes Association CEO Jeff Scott said several new varieties were coming into production for export this year such as sweet nectar, sweet sapphire, pristine seedless, long crimson, cotton candy and melody seedless. However, thompson seedless and crimson seedless are still expected to be Australia’s main export varieties.

“Việt Nam is one of the best favourable markets for Australian table grapes, especially thanks to the easy delivery through air flights between the two countries,” Scott told Việt Nam News.

“I expect the exporting volume of Australian table grapes into Việt Nam will reach 7,000 tonnes this year, nearly five times higher than that in 2016,” Scott said.

Besides table grapes, Australia is exporting two other types of fruits into Việt Nam, including citrus and cherry fruits.

Negotiations are also ongoing to bring Australian stone fruits into the Vietnamese market.

“I look forward to the trade ties between Australia and Việt Nam being closer and more and more Australian products being presented in Việt Nam, especially after Việt Nam officially became a member of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP),” Chan told Việt Nam News. — VNS


Source: https://vietnamnews.vn

 

 

Heightened security measures to reduce the risk of aviation terror acts to impact all Australian exporters

Could a humble packing shed in rural Australia be the chink in the armour for terrorists wanting to blow up a plane?


While it has not happened before, that is the scenario that changes to air freight security, rolling out today, are designed to stop.
The Department of Home Affairs has heightened the security screening requirements for all export air cargo, including food products like rock lobster and stone fruit, to ensure no potentially dangerous items make their way into flights leaving Australia.
From today all air freight will need to be screened piece by piece unless the sender is registered as a 'known consignor'.
In a letter to exporters, the department said the changes could cause delays and increase costs.


The vast majority of air freight will be scanned at a piece-level at either Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne or Perth airports.
Director of the Freight & Trade Alliance (FTA), Paul Zalai, said he expected bottlenecks at the four airports.


"I hope that I am wrong, but my gut feeling is that the implementation will be a mess and will take several months for everything to shake down," Mr Zalai said.

"It will take a while for industry to be able to make informed decisions on confirmed service levels and price."


Airfreight was generally used for higher value, time sensitive products.


According to the Department of Infrastructure the volume of international trade sent by air represents less than 0.1 per cent but accounts for more than 21 per cent of the dollar value at nearly $60 billion.

Seafood exporters invest to avoid a damaging backlog

Australia's lucrative live seafood exports were particularly vulnerable to delays.

"It's alive so it needs to be treated with the utmost care and speed is the biggest issue," said Michael Blake, managing director of the Australian Southern Rock Lobster Exporters Association. "That's why we are more vulnerable than other industries."

Exporters have been told to allow an extra four to six hours at Melbourne airport for their cargo to be screened.
Mr Blake said his product could not handle that additional time in transit.


Security checks on staff

To make sure his rock lobsters did not wait on the tarmac Mr Blake spent time and money to register as a known consignor.

That process differed depending on the business but essentially required that the supply chain was immune to product tampering and that any issues could be quickly detected.

"It's a real upgrade of security for our facility, that's for sure," Mr Blake said.

Every person working in his packing shed now had high-level security checks.

"It hasn't been overly difficult but it does take a fair bit of time to get everyone in your facility vetted and security checked and put in new procedures," Mr Blake said.

"Some people I know have put in surveillance cameras and swipe cards."

It costs about $400 per staff member to get security checks.

X-ray machine boom

There has been a flurry of sales for x-ray machines as logistics companies position themselves to cater for the heightened security requirements.

One company, Smiths Detection, had installed x-ray equipment at more than 50 sites across the country because of the regulatory changes.

Freight forwarding company Link Logistics International spent $100,000 on a new x-ray machine and explosives residue test to use for its Tasmanian customers.

"If I hadn't installed the equipment our cargo would need to go to Melbourne around six hours earlier to be put through the screening process," director Chris Fox said.

"Because we handle a lot of live seafood, lobsters and abalone, to add another six hours to that journey is just not a practical solution for the exporter."

While the x-ray machines and security measures would save on time, someone had to foot the bill.

For the rock lobster sector, logistics companies and processors said any additional costs would come off the beach price paid to fishermen.

The Department of Home Affairs declined to comment on whether domestic air cargo would soon face the same increased security measures as international freight.

Mr Blake said despite the spectre of delays and costs, the industry was broadly supportive of the measures. "We've all jumped on board now and we really are supportive of it to be honest because it's quite scary to think what could happen on a plane with freight," Mr Blake said. "We just need to do it in a way that doesn't compromise our product."

Source: www.abc.net.au/news/rural

ABC Rural

 

Halos™ seedless easy peel mandarins available in Australia

Halos™ Mandarins are grown in sunny California by Wonderful® Citrus and available in Australia for a limited time thanks to Turners International Marketing Ltd who manages the programme for the Australia and New Zealand markets.

Mano A. Babiolakis from Turners International Marketing Ltd is excited to launch Halos™ Mandarins a well recognised brand here in Australia. Halos™ Mandarins is one of the leading citrus brands in the USA and for a limited time only will be available here in Australia through specialist greengrocers in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney including Harris Farms, Drakes Supermarkets QLD and Market Place Fresh Melbourne.

We are pleased to be working with Nutrano Produce Group on the distribution of Halos™ Mandarins through their wholesale stands at the produce markets in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne with demonstrations taking place during key trading period.

Nutrano Produce Group CEO, George Haggar comments “The launch of Halos™ Mandarins at the Nutrano Produce Group stand in the Sydney market this week went well and we are looking forward to launching at our Nutrano Produce Group stands in Brisbane and Melbourne markets next week.”

Halos™ Mandarins are grown in sunny California and are a perfect health snack, loved by both kids and grown-ups alike. Halos™ Mandarins are SWEET – sweetened by Mother Nature on the branch making them a great alternative to lollies and soft drinks. They are also SEEDLESS and have a soft thin skin which makes them EASY PEEL for kids and easy for everyone to enjoy.

Halos™ Mandarins are available in 750g prepacks or 9kg loose carton in specialist greengrocers. Look out for the special Halos™ fruit stickers.

For more information:
Mano Babiolakis
Turners International Marketing
Email: mano@globalproduce.com.au
Mobile: +61413 482 158


Publication date : 2/28/2019

Source: www.freshplaza.com 

Australia and Vietnam strengthen trade ties through table grapes

As the Australian table grape export season commences, Australian growers head to Vietnam to boost trade relations.

Three key growers from the Sunraysia region, which is responsible for around 99 per cent of table grape exports, representation from the Australian Table Grapes Association and a delegation from Austrade, will be on the ground in both Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City from February 28 to March 1 to promote the premium product.

Hosted under the Hort Innovation Taste Australia banner, the upcoming trade marketing activity aims to cement existing trade relations and develop new and exciting partnerships.

Hort Innovation acting trade lead Dianne Phan said Vietnam was currently the 7th largest importer of Australian table grapes.

“Vietnam is a key exporting country for Australia, and the Australian table grape industry has worked hard to educate and promote Australian grapes to Vietnamese consumers,” she said.

“Over the past four years, Australian table grape exports have grown 73 per cent, demonstrating the increasing demand for our high quality and premium produce.

“Moving forward, we expect that we will be able to produce more of the grapes that Vietnamese consumers love.”

Australian Table Grapes Association CEO Jeff Scott said several new varieties were coming into production for export this year such as; Sweet Nectar, Sweet Sapphire, Pristine Seedless, Long Crimson, Cotton Candy and Melody Seedless to name a few.

“Many growers have planted new varieties in large numbers under commercial licences and have commenced exporting,” he said.

“If any variety proves successful or demand is high from importing countries, additional plantings will take place to satisfy demand.”

Mr Scott said Thompson Seedless and Crimson Seedless were still expected to be Australia's main export varieties.

“As an industry, we are seeing year on year growth in table grape exports and this is a very pleasing outcome for growers.”

Mr Scott will present an industry update during the trade activities in Vietnam providing key partners with a seasonal overview of the 2019 crop forecast and the 5 to 10-year crop yield predictions.

He will also provide more information about the systems Australian industry have in place to continually maintain Australia’s clean, green and safe reputation.

For more information:
Farah Abdurahman
Tel: +61 447 304 255
Email: Farah.Abdurahman@horticulture.com.au


Publication date : 2/27/2019

Source: www.freshplaza.com  

 

Australian N & A brings Swing apple on board

Australian company N & A is owned by the Cathels family. Rob showed up at recent Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin for the official signing of the Swing® license and for the yearly Swing® global meeting.

Rob explains: “The N & A Group is a third generation family owned business which is based in Sydney. Our distribution centre is located in Orchard Hills in Western Sydney, supplying the major supermarkets and fresh fruit wholesale markets across Australia."

"Our Exports are predominately to the Asian and Middle Eastern markets, with future plans of expansion to the European Markets. Our farming land in Batlow, in the Snowy Mountains region of New South Wales consists of approximately 100 hectares growing of Apples, conventional and organic production, as well as organic berry production with a further 900ha available for planting."


N & A played an instrumental role in the successful introduction of Kanzi® to the Australian market, and are now the biggest grower of Kanzi® in Australia amongst the partners in the Kanzi Marketing Group.

The success with Kanzi® shows the value of branding, and the support of a global group of partners are vital elements to ensure the success of a new apple in the unique Australian retail market.

The Cathels family decided to join the RedMoon® company for Swing® after several years of discussions and research into this product. We found that the RedMoon® company had and has a clear vision of the direction they were heading to create and maintain sustainable brands and relationships. As a family owned company we were very impressed with the professionalism, values, culture and passion that stood behind the brand which gave us full confidence in building a long term relationship.

In a perpetually competitive market, Swing® is a clear stand out amongst the rest. We have never seen a more convincing apple because of a full range of advantages: attractive rustic fruit, resistance to scab and very tolerant to other diseases like fireblight and powdery mildew – this allows growers to implement very sustainable and responsible farming.

The cultivar “Xeleven” stores well, giving super long shelf life – which is perfect for the Australian consumer. And, with its super texture, customers globally get a chance to taste and experience a whole new super fruit. With customers now choosing to make health conscious purchases, we believe Swing® will move to the top of the consumer’s shopping list with all the health benefits it has to offer. It is simply a great all round apple! Our intention is planting up to 100 hectares of Swing® in Australia, both at our orchards in Batlow, NSW and throughout our group of committed supply partner’s orchards in the best growing regions across the country. Because of its robust genetics, this apple ticks all the boxes for responsible farming.“

Braun Jürgen, CEO of RedMoon® Company: "Indeed responsible farming is essential for us. We want all our partners around the world, for all our brands and varieties, to reduce the human impact on nature and produce as sustainable as possible. With Cathels we have the next family run business joining and we love short decision ways, open minds, like-minded people with a large horizon. On the other side Swing® speaks for itself: Consumers are struck by the rustic look which reminds them “old varieties”, they like the taste and the color, now a lot about healthy ingredients, in short the consumer out there wants to eat healthy, nature-oriented and sustainable apples.

The interest throughout the world is amazing: all Swing®s of this season are already sold. The production in France and Italy is placed in many countries in Europe, Middle and Far East, our customers and retailers love the outstanding apple. That’s the reason why we feel comfortable to increase hectares and partner with the whole world. Lots of Partners from other brands like Kiku® and Isaaq® have already expressed their interest, as it fits perfectly into their schemes for responsible farming as well. At Fruit Attraction 2019 in Madrid we will rock again with good news.”

For more information:
Red Moon Ltd
Email: info@redmoon-apple.com

Source: www.freshplaza.com 

Image: Kanzi apple - APAL


Publication date : 2/27/2019

Costa announces half-yearly results

Firm reports lower profit number than expected but remains on target for medium to long term growth

Following reports of lower than expected sales ahead of Christmas, Costa Group has announced detail of its performance in the six months to 30 December 2018.

Costa CEO, Harry Debney said the results were anticipated to be considerably lower because of the muted trading performance during December.

“The six-month financial period to December has delivered a lower profit number than expected. There were several contributing factors to this, some of which had been accounted for including bringing African Blue on to our balance sheet as a result of majority ownership, additional preharvest farming cost investment through our increased international footprint and an ‘off’ citrus season in terms of the biennial nature of the crop,” said Debney.

The company said it remains on track to meet medium to long term profit growth objectives, which incorporate its five core product categories as well as international development.

Revenue decreased in the produce segment by 4.3 per cent compared with the six months prior, and total transacted sales were at A$615.7m compared with A$620.3m in the first half of 2018.

Citrus

The biennial nature of citrus is said to have caused the 4.3 per cent dip in revenue for Costa’s produce department. Lower quality toward the tail end of the season was also to blame.

“Exports for the 2018 calendar season comprised 73 per cent of packed volume, with Japan being the largest market taking 40 per cent of total exports, followed by the US, New Zealand and China,” said Debney. “Exposure to the Korean market is expected to increase in 2019 as tariffs are further reduced under the Australia – Korea Free Trade Agreement.”

Avocados

Costa’s avocados also journeyed to Asia this year for the first season. The company said 60,000 trays of exports were initiated to markets in South East Asia, including Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia.

Domestic crop was mainly sourced from northern New South Wales, with some residual volume coming from Queensland. Central Queensland’s overlap with the end of Western Australia’s season resulted in a supply glut that lowered prices.

Berries

Strong production volumes for blueberries were also apparent at Costa’s Corindi farm in New South Wales but were offset by lower volumes from Queensland.

A new Arana premium variety attracted a 23 per cent premium on 200g packs at retail level and a double-digit premium at wholesale.

The company said raspberry contribution was disappointing.

Internationally, earnings from Costa’s Morocco, China and Americas-based operations are weighted to the first half of 2018, the company said.

Pre-harvest investment in Morocco and China through July-December decreased earnings which occur during the harvest period in the first half of the year.

“There has been a good early start to the blueberry harvest at the main Manlai farm with positive market reception reflected in premium pricing received for our large ‘jumbo’ berries,” said Debney.

The company said Driscoll’s US-based royalties produced continued revenue growth.

Tomato

Tomatoes also experienced an undesirable result with an excellent production of snacking varieties being met by weaker retail performance, resulting in more sales across the wholesale channel lowering price realisation. Truss production and pricing was also lower.

Costa will be showcasing a new truss variety in 2019 called Endeavour, which it said features enhanced yield, shelf life and disease resistance.

Mushroom

Mushrooms bucked the fluctuation trend and met financial targets for the period.

The recent higher cost of straw is expected to manifest over 2019 as Costa replenishes inventory stock. A new compost facility is also expected to have a positive impact and will operate from the fourth quarter of 2019.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Camellia Aebischer

Australian fresh produce industry gearing up for export security changes

The Australian fresh produce sector is preparing for changes to air cargo export regulations, which will be introduced next week.

From 1 March 2019 all international export air cargo from Australia must be examined at piece-level by a Regulated Air Cargo Agent (RACA), or originate from a Known Consignor, and use technology like x-ray, or be physically inspected.

The Department of Home Affairs says the changes are necessary to strengthen security.

"The Australian Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe and secure," a spokesperson from the Department of Home Affairs said. "Aviation is an enduring and attractive target for terrorists. The Department has a strong and comprehensive aviation security framework that is continually revised to ensure that we remain ahead of the evolving threat."

The Australian Horticultural Exporters and Importers Association (AHEIA) has previously warned the move will have costly implications on Australian fresh produce industries, and has estimated total added costs to the industry could be up to A$0.22/kg, as well as up to a 24-hour delay at terminals.

The Department of Home Affairs says it has given the industry plenty of notice and that it has pro-actively engaged with industry to foster readiness for including writing directly to exporters.

"Security examination of export air cargo is not new," the spokes-person said. "All export air cargo is already examined prior to uplift onto an aircraft. The requirements being introduced on 1 March 2019 have been in place for United States bound cargo since July 2017. If businesses have questions about how the change will impact their current arrangements, they should contact their supply chain in the first instance."

The Cherry Growers Australia (CGA) are one of many industry groups that have advised their members to prepare themselves for the change, also advising that Currently, 30 per cent of Australian Cherries are exported to more than 30 countries in a highly competitive international market. It adds, that exporting cherries is a specialised market requiring attention and detail to cultural sensitivities, biosecurity, packaging, market access and entry and transportation. The type and variety of cherry exported is determined by market access and cultural tendencies accounting for preferences in taste, colour and flavour.

Exporters who have not already done so, should consider things like: packaging of products, handling of consolidated cargo, scheduling of deliveries, and how cargo is transported to reduce possible changes to delivery times and increased costs, therefore reducing delays. Businesses should also Consider becoming a 'Known Consignor'.

Further information about the change can be found on the Department’s webpage, www.homeaffairs.gov.au/about-us/our-portfolios/transport-security/air-cargo-and-aviation/air-cargo


Publication date : 2/22/2019
Author: matthew@freshplaza.com
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