Avocado

Avocados From Mexico launches digital experience for the Big Game

Avocados From Mexico has launched a multifaceted campaign designed to engage consumers and make avocados shippable at every touchpoint during the biggest avocado occasion of the year.

From the "House of Goodness" digital experience to in-store QR codes that drive directly to the brand's website and a new partnership with eCommerce Acceleration platform MikMak, AFM's 2022 Big Game campaign will link brand awareness and sales "like never before".

AFM has built its brand around this occasion, and recently announced its return as a Big Game advertiser with a 30-second spot.

"We've built the AFM brand on a foundation of innovation – now, we're back in the Big Game with not only an ad but another innovative, fully integrated campaign," said Alvaro Luque, President and CEO of Avocados From Mexico.

Click here to read more

Source: https://www.freshfruitportal.com/

 

 

 

Global avocado production estimated to triple from 2010 to 2030

 Avocado production is on track to triple its growth by 2030 compared to levels in 2010 by reaching 12 metric tons (MT), according to an FAO report.

The OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2021-2030 says that, while avocado has the lowest production level among the major tropical fruits, it has experienced the fastest growth in production in recent years.

This fruit is expected to remain the fastest-growing commodity of the major tropical fruits during the reporting period.

Ample global demand and lucrative export unit prices continue to be the main drivers of this growth, stimulating substantial investments in area expansion in both major and emerging production zones.

Production and Consumption

Avocado production has so far been concentrated in a small number of regions and countries, with the top ten producing areas currently accounting for almost 80 percent of world production.

Despite the above, the report said that around 74 percent of avocado production is expected to remain in Latin America and the Caribbean, given the favorable growth conditions in the region.

In response to the rapid growth in global demand, avocado is expected to become the most traded tropical fruit by 2030, reaching 3.9MT of exports and surpassing both pineapples and mangoes in terms of quantity.

Given the high average unit prices of avocado, the total value of world avocado exports would reach an estimated US$8.3 billion in constant value terms from 2014 to 2016, placing the avocado as one of the most valuable fruits.

Production in Mexico, the world's largest producer and exporter, is expected to grow 5.2 percent annually over the next ten years due to continued growth in demand in the U.S.

As such, and despite growing competition from emerging exporters, Mexico is expected to further increase its market share to 63 percent in 2030.

The report also said that the U.S. and the EU are expected to remain the top importers, accounting for 40 percent and 31 percent of world imports in 2030, respectively.

However, imports are also increasing rapidly in many other areas such as China and some Middle Eastern countries, and, as measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman index of all importers, the concentration of imports is gradually decreasing.

Source: https://www.freshfruitportal.com/ 

Avocados dumped amid glut in domestic supply and imports from overseas

West Australian avocado growers are dumping fruit because it's not worth the cost of packing and sending it to market.

Avocado prices have plummeted to just $18 a tray on the back of a massive national crop and a record production year in WA, which has led to an oversupply of product.

Slow sales into Sydney and Melbourne – WA's key domestic markets – have added to downward price pressures after lockdowns shuttered the food service industry for months.

Grower Vic Grozotis says he's been forced to discard perfectly good lower-grade fruit in a pit on his farm at Manjimup, about 300 kilometres south of Perth.

He says the fruit, which has purely cosmetic defects, would have been sold to the food service industry in a normal production year.

"We've had to dig a hole to bury a lot of the avocados we can't sell," he said.

"To have to dump fruit which had a commercial return last year and has a zero return this year has a big impact on farmer's bottom line and some farmers are losing money this year.

"It's disappointing, the resources that go into producing avocados — it's quite high and it's expensive.

Imports continue amid domestic supply glut

This season, 8.2 million trays of avocados are expected to be picked in WA — a 233 per cent increase on last year's crop.

With so much fruit produced domestically, growers like Mr Grozotis are questioning why major retailers are still importing fruit from New Zealand.

Industry data shows that tens of thousands of trays of overseas fruit is being brought in to be sold on Australian supermarket shelves every week.

Twenty per cent of fruit that's being sold in Australia is imported, and that could be sourced from Western Australia," he said.

"Industry has told our supermarkets that there would be more than adequate production from Australian produce, but they seem to have ignored that.

"We need to get retailers on board will selling 100 per cent Australian fruit, particularly in Queensland. They are denying Australian consumers the option to purchase Australian fruit.

"You'd think you'd see our supermarkets giving a full commitment to Australian producers, particularly in these difficult times."

Hopes of import phase-out

Avocados Australia CEO John Tyas hoped major retailers would phase out the imports as the Australian crop reached a consistently self-sufficient production level.

"This year we clearly don't need to see any imported avocados as you can see by the prices," he said.

"We could easily supply all the avocados that are needed in Australia this year.

"But I guess New Zealand has been in Australia for a long time and they can't turn the tap off overnight."

Mr Tyas said the industry body wanted to see importation of fruit phased out as Australian production grows.

"I think ultimately that's what will need to happen over the next few years as we can meet demand week-in-week-out there will be less of a need for that product," he said.

Exports still challenging

While export markets will be key to balancing future domestic supply gluts, developing consistent trade ties with overseas markets will take time.

Many international markets are already importing fruit from lower-cost competitor countries such as Chile and Peru.

This season unprecedented freight and logistics challenges has made it even harder to access overseas markets.

"It's very difficult to get containers and air freight is very expensive so the export market at the moment is extremely difficult," Mr Grozotis said.

Adjusting to the new normal

At the national level, this year's harvest is tipped to reach 120,000 tonnes, up from around 39,600 tonnes in 2010.

Manager Alan Blight fears supply gluts will become the new normal, because only half of national avocado tree plantings are at maturity.

"Conditions were good for productivity this year but there are also an awful lot of trees that have been planted that weren't producing this year," he said.

"It's hard to see with all of the trees in the ground people making money into the future."

In the meantime, Mr Blight hoped consumers would take advantage of the cheap produce available.

"There has never been a better opportunity to get in and try avocados and start the habit today, become addicted," he said.

Source: 

By Jessica Hayes and Lucinda Jose

New Zealand - Spotlight on quality avocado to Australia

Jen Scoular:

Normally there is a collective sigh of relief as NZ finishes an avocado export season but this year it's a different story. They experienced significant quality issues post-November, especially for their avocados going into the Australian market.

NZ harvests avocados five months of the year for export markets, and aim to harvest just in time to be cooled and packed, loaded on to the appropriate vessel, arrive in Australia to be cleared, trucked to the distribution centre or wholesale market and be available to customer orders.

Avocados are unlike kiwifruit and apples where they are all harvested at once, then coolstored until the market is ready. The tree is the coolstore, and post-harvest needs to be as speedy as possible.

Another challenge is that the New Zealand growing season is cooler and wetter than growing seasons in Western Australia, Chile, Peru and Mexico — who are NZ competitors.

 Source: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12210443 

Plant Biosecurity Advice 2019-P03 - Release of the draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh avocado fruit from Chile

28 February 2019

This Biosecurity Advice notifies stakeholders of the release of the draft report for the review of biosecurity import requirements for fresh avocado fruit from Chile.

The draft report proposes that importation of fresh avocado fruit from all commercial production areas of Chile be permitted, subject to a range of biosecurity requirements.

The department has now published the draft report for a 60 calendar day public consultation period, closing on 29 April 2019.

Stakeholders are invited to have their say on the draft report. The department will consider all stakeholder comments received during the consultation period in preparing a final report.

The department announced the commencement of this risk analysis on 23 March 2018, via Biosecurity Advice 2018-05, advising it would be progressed as a review of biosecurity import requirements.

The draft report identifies seven quarantine pests associated with fresh avocado fruit from Chile that require risk management measures to reduce the biosecurity risk to an acceptable level. The quarantine pests identified are:

  • Fruit flies: Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata)
  • Mealybugs: grape mealybug (Pseudococcus maritimus)
  • Thrips: Chilean flower thrips (Frankliniella australis), tamarugo thrips (Frankliniella gemina) and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis)
  • Mites: avocado brown mite (Oligonychus punicae) and avocado red mite (Oligonychus yothersi).

 

  • The draft report proposes risk management measures, in combination with operational systems, to reduce the risks posed by the seven quarantine pests so as to achieve the appropriate level of protection for Australia. These measures include:
  • area freedom, fruit treatment (such as cold disinfestation treatment) or hard condition of fruit (for the Hass cultivar only) for Mediterranean fruit fly
  • consignment freedom verified by pre-export visual inspection and, if detected, remedial action for grape mealybug, Oligonychus spider mites and thrips
  • The draft report and more information about this risk analysis are available on the department’s website. Printed copies of the report are available on request.

The department invites stakeholders interested in receiving information and updates on biosecurity risk analyses to subscribe via the department’s online subscription service. By subscribing to Biosecurity Risk Analysis Plant, you will receive Biosecurity Advices and other notifications relating to plant biosecurity policy, including this risk analysis.

Dr Marion Healy
First Assistant Secretary
Biosecurity Plant Division

Source: http://www.agriculture.gov.au/biosecurity 

 

Costa announces half-yearly results

Firm reports lower profit number than expected but remains on target for medium to long term growth

Following reports of lower than expected sales ahead of Christmas, Costa Group has announced detail of its performance in the six months to 30 December 2018.

Costa CEO, Harry Debney said the results were anticipated to be considerably lower because of the muted trading performance during December.

“The six-month financial period to December has delivered a lower profit number than expected. There were several contributing factors to this, some of which had been accounted for including bringing African Blue on to our balance sheet as a result of majority ownership, additional preharvest farming cost investment through our increased international footprint and an ‘off’ citrus season in terms of the biennial nature of the crop,” said Debney.

The company said it remains on track to meet medium to long term profit growth objectives, which incorporate its five core product categories as well as international development.

Revenue decreased in the produce segment by 4.3 per cent compared with the six months prior, and total transacted sales were at A$615.7m compared with A$620.3m in the first half of 2018.

Citrus

The biennial nature of citrus is said to have caused the 4.3 per cent dip in revenue for Costa’s produce department. Lower quality toward the tail end of the season was also to blame.

“Exports for the 2018 calendar season comprised 73 per cent of packed volume, with Japan being the largest market taking 40 per cent of total exports, followed by the US, New Zealand and China,” said Debney. “Exposure to the Korean market is expected to increase in 2019 as tariffs are further reduced under the Australia – Korea Free Trade Agreement.”

Avocados

Costa’s avocados also journeyed to Asia this year for the first season. The company said 60,000 trays of exports were initiated to markets in South East Asia, including Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia.

Domestic crop was mainly sourced from northern New South Wales, with some residual volume coming from Queensland. Central Queensland’s overlap with the end of Western Australia’s season resulted in a supply glut that lowered prices.

Berries

Strong production volumes for blueberries were also apparent at Costa’s Corindi farm in New South Wales but were offset by lower volumes from Queensland.

A new Arana premium variety attracted a 23 per cent premium on 200g packs at retail level and a double-digit premium at wholesale.

The company said raspberry contribution was disappointing.

Internationally, earnings from Costa’s Morocco, China and Americas-based operations are weighted to the first half of 2018, the company said.

Pre-harvest investment in Morocco and China through July-December decreased earnings which occur during the harvest period in the first half of the year.

“There has been a good early start to the blueberry harvest at the main Manlai farm with positive market reception reflected in premium pricing received for our large ‘jumbo’ berries,” said Debney.

The company said Driscoll’s US-based royalties produced continued revenue growth.

Tomato

Tomatoes also experienced an undesirable result with an excellent production of snacking varieties being met by weaker retail performance, resulting in more sales across the wholesale channel lowering price realisation. Truss production and pricing was also lower.

Costa will be showcasing a new truss variety in 2019 called Endeavour, which it said features enhanced yield, shelf life and disease resistance.

Mushroom

Mushrooms bucked the fluctuation trend and met financial targets for the period.

The recent higher cost of straw is expected to manifest over 2019 as Costa replenishes inventory stock. A new compost facility is also expected to have a positive impact and will operate from the fourth quarter of 2019.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Camellia Aebischer

China and the great international avocado takeover

The avocado is spreading to every corner of the world. It is difficult to know why the avocado is catching on globally. It may be the influence of the US culinary culture. It could be a result of marketing efforts. It might also just be that in the age of globalization, the most delicious foods will inevitably find their way into the mouths of discerning eaters no matter where they are.

The avocado boom is decades-long in the US. But since 2015, growth in avocado imports to the US have slowed. The rest of the world picked up the slack. For example, imports to China grew from just 154 tons in 2012 to over 31,000 tons in 2017. Data from the first quarter of 2018 suggests the growth continued. Other countries that have seen similar spikes in recent years include Saudi Arabia, Ireland and South Korea.


Read the rest of the article : https://www.freshplaza.com/article/9066889/china-and-the-great-international-avocado-takeover/

First Australian avocados land in Japan

Australia’s first-ever avocado exports to Japan have recently arrived in the Asian country, receiving a ceremonious launch at the Australian embassy in Tokyo on Tuesday.

Government officials from both sides were in attendance, along with Japanese importers and retailers as well as industry representatives from Hort Innovation and Avocados Australia.

A new protocol signed in May allows the export of Australian Hass avocados grown in Queensland fruit fly-free areas to Japan.

Avocados Australia CEO John Tyas said the new trade agreement was “very exciting news for the Australian avocado industry”, and acknowledged the cumulative hard work by all agencies involved in making the trade agreement possible.

“It is very exciting for the industry that we can now add Japan to our exclusive list of export destinations for our top-quality premium Hass avocados,” he said.

“The industry in Australia is growing rapidly and we are very confident that Australia will be producing about 115,000 tonnes of avocados per year by 2025. This is 50 per cent more than our current production, and expanding our domestic and international markets is essential.”

Hort Innovation CEO Matt Brand said Australia has built a solid reputation for its premium quality fresh fruit and vegetables.

“Table grapes and citrus fruits are already established export products in the Japanese market and their market success has demonstrated a willingness by consumers to pay a premium price for high-quality produce,” he said.

“Japan is wholly dependent on avocado imports for their national supply. Until now, their avocados were predominantly sourced from Mexico and to a lesser extent, Peru, the US and New Zealand.”

He added that introducing Australian avocados into the marketplace offers Japanese consumers “a point of difference to their current supply” and will strengthen trade ties with local exporters.

“We are confident that this new market access opportunity will enhance trade relations with Japan, and in time, open up market access for other premium fresh fruit and vegetable items,” he said.

 

Source: https://www.freshfruitportal.com 

Australian avocado production grows

In the past decade production of avocados has nearly doubled, projected to 115,000 tonnes by 2025
At 77,000 tonnes in 2017/18 the Australian avocado industry is on a long term upward trajectory.

“One-third of Australia’s avocado trees have yet to reach their prime production years but enough of the new plantings have come on line this year to boost the industry above last year’s 66,000 tonnes,” said Avocados Australia CEO, John Tyas.

Tyas says by 2025 the industry is on track to produce around 115,000 tonnes annually.

“Our production in 2017/18 was 17 per cent more than the previous year, with a gross value of production estimated at A$557 million.”

Domestic consumption has held steady for a second year in a row at 3.5kg per person, per year, but Tyas is confident there is more room for growth.

Most of the Australian supply is grown in Queensland, who host 62 per cent of plantings, second to Western Australia at 25 per cent, followed by New South Wales, Victoria and Australia.

“In 2017/18 Hass represented 78 per cent of production. Shepard, a green-skin variety grown in Queensland through late Summer and Autumn, made up 19 per cent of production, and at that time of year, is the dominant Australian variety on the market.”

To help balance supply and demand in future, Avocados Australia is working with Hort Innovation to expand both domestic and international markets. “At the moment we export less than five per cent of our production annually, but that will increase as our production increases,” Tyas said.

Currently Malaysia and Singapore are the main export markets for Australian avocados.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com Author: Camellia Aebischer

Mexican avocado producers seek to export to Australia and New Zealand

The Broad and Progressive Agreement of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), also known as the TPP-11, has allowed Mexican avocado producers to set their sights on the markets of Australia and New Zealand.

The two countries are important avocado producers in that region, but they have a very marked seasonal crop and, therefore, are complementary markets, said Ramon Paz Vega, the strategic adviser of the Association of Producers and Packers Exporters of Avocado in Mexico (APEAM).

Given this situation, and coupled with the growing demand in both nations, Mexico could take advantage of this opportunity and export its avocados to these markets when they lack local production, Paz Vega stated in an interview with Notimex.

Even though its difficult to enter these two markets because of the strict phytosanitary measures they have, Mexico has already started some negotiations in order to enter them.

For the moment, Mexico will continue exporting its avocados to Japan, where 95 percent of the avocado is imported from Mexico, which doesn't have any tariffs or any other barrier for this product there, he said.

Singapore is also an attractive market for Mexican avocados and producers expect to send at least four thousand tons of avocados there at the end of the harvest season, i.e. on June 30, he said.

Paz Vega also said this year's production would amount to just over two million tons, i.e. 10 percent more than the previous year. 835 thousand tons of the production will be sent to the United States, the main export market of the Mexican product.

The CPTPP represents a market of 372 million potential consumers and representatives of the 11 countries of the Asia-Pacific region - Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam - signed the agreement on March 8.

This established the largest free trade area in the world, with modern disciplines that meet the challenges of 21st century economies.

According to the Ministry of Economy (SE), Mexico will obtain significant and immediate access to 90 percent of the block's market. This will allow it to diversify its economy by opening preferential access to six new markets -Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam - and deepen its access to the Japanese agricultural market.


Source: Notimex via www.freshplaza.com 

Publication date: 6/6/2018

WA Avocado growers looking forward to developing market in Japan

A Western Australian avocado packer has welcomed new market access to Japan, saying it will be needed to help ensure growers get a good price for their produce into the future.

Last week, the Australian government reached a new protocol agreement for Hass avocados with Japan, and will be calling for applications for accreditation for growers in the coming weeks. Managing Director of Karri Country Produce, Jennie Franceschi, says at the current rate of industry expansion producers will need new markets like this to develop, with a major increase in volume forecast for coming years.

"It's a positive step as there are a lot of trees in the ground and production in Australia is going to be increasing significantly," she said. "So the figures I have been given by industry, there are 30 per cent of trees not producing and 20 per cent of trees that are producing, but not in full production. So that means half the trees in the ground are either not producing or under producing. I always think it's important to have many market distribution channels."

She praised the Australian Government for getting this access, saying the more supply channels available means more diversity and therefore more stability. Ms Franceschi adds that prices are "not exciting" for growers at the moment due to the amount of fruit on the market.

"The industry as a whole is under a bit of pressure at the moment," Ms Franceschi said. "We haven't seen these sort of returns in around five years. I think it's just getting people to eat them. There have been some very good sales, but it just hasn't encouraged more people to buy. So it's not really price, and I am not sure why people are not buying. There are good volumes around and very good quality. So, if you look at the current pricing in Australia, we will be very effective up there (in Japan)."

Initially the opportunity will only be available to fruit fly free areas, such as Western Australia, Riverland (South Australia) and Tasmania, and Ms Franceschi admits there may not be huge number of volumes at first, as growers get an understanding of the market.

"I don't think there will be huge quantities, but I will definitely be putting some fruit up there," she said. "Just to understand the lay of the land, as I think that's important to do that and learn. I have worked with the Japanese lately and I have found them to be honourable. They are hard, like you've got to go through a process, but they are very honourable. So I think it's very promising."

Among Australia's advantages is the proximity to Asia, meaning the fruit can get to market fairly quickly as well as Australia's clean and green image. This has put the produce high on the list for many Asian countries, according to Ms Franceschi, who conducted her own taste testing while recently in Malaysia.

"They had some fruit from other countries, as well as fruit from Australia - not Western Australian, but East Coast fruit," Ms Franceschi said. "We bought some from other countries, because we wanted to understand why our fruit was retailing for more, which was quite a premium over these other countries. I wanted to see if there was a legitimate reason for this. But when we cut the fruit there wasn't a very good seed in one, and the flavour wasn't the same. So everyone who tried it, all picked the Aussie avocado as being of a superior flavour and there was also more flesh."

The Hass season is underway in the east but the west is still a few months away. The last estimates put the Western Australian crop at a similar level as last season, but with winter to get through, those numbers are expected to firm up at a later date.

For more information:
Jennie Franceschi
Karri Country Produce
Phone: +61 8 9777 2246
Publication date: 5/31/2018
Author: Matthew Russell
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com