Vietnam

Australian citrus sees opportunity in Vietnam

Trade figures for Australian citrus exports have shown preference in Vietnam for larger fruit
Citrus Australia trade figures ending November 2018 show Australia had exported a total of 247,000 tonnes, at A$448m (US$320m) in citrus in the 12 months to 30 November.

The industry body said the slight decline in volume was attributed to a lighter mandarin crop out of the northern state of Queensland, compared with 2017, but that export volumes to date were better than previously predicted due to a larger orange crop.

Key markets, China and Japan, took 50 per cent and 18 per cent of the country’s orange exports respectively, with China importing almost a third (30 per cent) of the total mandarin share.

Vietnam also shone through as an emerging market, with export figures continuing to grow. David Daniels, Citrus Australia market development manager said Vietnam was becoming an important market for Australian citrus.

“Vietnamese consumers prefer slightly larger fruit, which complements fruit [sizes] required in other markets,” he said. “Demand in these smaller markets means further opportunities for Australian growers.”

“Key markets in 2018 were China, Japan, the US, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates,” Citrus Australia said in a statement. “Thailand was our second biggest market for mandarins, taking 12 per cent or 7,396 tonnes, while the US took 10 per cent of mandarins or 6,190 tonnes.”

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Camellia Aebischer

Making inroads with irradiation

Demand for irradiation services is increasing in Australia, as key export markets accept it as a phytosanitary treatment
Regarded as simple and highly reliable, irradiation treatment is opening doors for Australian exporters in Asia.

Within the past 18 months, both Vietnam and Thailand have recognised irradiation as an accepted phytosanitary treatment for selected Australian fruit lines.

The irradiation treatment process takes about 45 minutes to complete and is a continuous flow of palletised product on a conveyor. It is conducted within the confines of a chilled room, meaning the consignment can be loaded for export immediately after treatment without any disruption to the cool chain.

Once treated, the fruit is free to travel to its destination by whichever means desired. It means airfreight is now a viable option for Australian exporters targeting discerning consumers with a preference for the freshest possible fruit.

Australian cherry and table grape suppliers are already sending fruit to Vietnam under this method, with demand for irradiation services from these two sectors exceeding expectations, according to Ben Reilly of Steritech, an Australian company specialising in irradiation treatment from a facility in Brisbane.

“We expected demand to peak at the start and end of the grape season, but over 2017/18 the demand for airfreight treatments was season-long,” Reilly said. “Importers are excited to receive early shipments of the freshest grape variety being harvested. For cherries there really is no other viable option for airfreight.”

Australia and Thailand announced a new irradiation pathway for horticultural exports in September. Australian persimmons and Thai mangoes were the first products to be ticked off for approval under the irradiation plan.

Produced primarily in south-east Queensland, Australian persimmons have previously been exported to Thailand under cold treatment. It’s unlikely irradiated Australian persimmons will be shipped in significant volumes, however, the protocol is being viewed as a significant win as it sets a precedence for other products to follow.

Reilly can also see doors opening for irradiated Australian fruit in other markets across Asia and around the world.

“The treatment is highly reliable with fewer variables that can impact efficacy, which is increasingly important to regulators,” he said. “It’s a unique combination of commercial, technical and environmental benefits that are driving the growth.”

Such is the promise irradiation shows for Australian exporters, Steritech is developing a second facility in Melbourne, which is on track to be open for exports over the 2019/20 Australian summer. Melbourne is located closer to the country’s major cherry and grape production regions than Steritech’s Brisbane facility, which was initially built to handle Australia’s tropical crops.

“With the Melbourne facility, Australian grapes and cherries should be capable of arriving in markets like Vietnam and Thailand within 48 to 72 hours of being picked,” Reilly explained. “This would provide a tremendous advantage for Australian producers competing in a global market.”

Read more about market access gains being made by Australian exporters with irradiation in the December 2018/January 2019 edition of Asiafruit Magazine, out now.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Matthew Jones

Vietnam: Vinh Phuc province exports first red flesh dragon fruits to Australia

Last week, the first batch of red flesh dragon fruits from Vietnam’s Vinh Phuc province was exported Australia. According to the Vietnam Trade Office in Australia, this is the first time Vietnamese red flesh dragon fruits have been exported to the Aussie market.

Australia is a choosy but promising market for Vietnamese farm produce. Exporters are advised to follow Australia’s quarantine regulations on cultivation areas, packaging, irradiation and pesticide residues right in Vietnam.

According to en.vietnamplus.vn, the export to Australia is expected to open up a chance for Vietnam to ship the fruit to the US and Europe. It took Vietnam nine years to negotiate and complete all the necessary procedures to export dragon fruit to Australia. Previously, Vinh Phuc’s red fresh dragon fruits had already been shipped to Japan and Malaysia.


Publication date : 9/25/2018

Source: http://www.freshplaza.com

Vietnam: Export fruit enters choosy markets

According to the Vietnamese Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), after many years of negotiation, Vietnam has overcome technical barriers an is now able to enter choosy markets including Australia, the US, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea.

By April 2018, Vietnam had exported over $1.3 billion worth of fruits, an increase of 30 percent year-on- year. In 2017, the export turnover from fruits was $3.5 billion, nearly twice as much as 2016 ($1.7 billion). The figure is expected to reach $4.3-4.5 billion this year.

Vietnam is able to meet strict requirements set by import countries on origin tracing. The efficiency of trade promotions, branding and the connection between farmers and exporters is also very good.

According to Hoang Trung, head of the Plant Protection Agency, it took Vietnam seven years to obtain the right for Vietnam’s rambutan to enter the New Zealand market. And only after 10 years of negotiations did the US open its market to Vietnam’s star apple.

Source: english.vietnamnet.vn

Publication date: 7/5/2018

Vietnam wants its mangoes to be a key export product

The South Vietnamese province of Dong Thap, the largest mango producer in the Mekong Delta with 9,200 hectares and an annual production of almost 100 thousand tons, intends to turn this fruit into a key export product by 2020.

According to Nguyen Thanh Tai, the deputy director of the local Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, to achieve this purpose, Dong Thap has invested in improving its technological infrastructure, a levee system, and agricultural technology in order to achieve Global Good Agricultural Practices (Global GAP) and remarkable results in the post harvest industry.

He said that two areas devoted to growing mango in the city of Cao Lanh, which have a combined extension of 33 hectares, had achieved Global GAP standards, while two other areas, which together amount to more than 48 hectares, met the standards of Good Agricultural Practices of Vietnam (VietGAP).

So far, said Thanh Tai, the town has developed six safe mango production areas with an area of ​​more than 416 hectares, and it has registered the intellectual property of its Cat Chu Cao Lanh and Mango Cao Lanh brands.

Thanh Tai highlighted that the province had managed to maintain the mango supply throughout the year.

Meanwhile, Nguyen Phuong Tuyen, the head of the Office of Technology and Information Technology Research of the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, said the province wouldn't expand the cultivation areas of mango in the future, but that it would focus on investing in storage and processing areas to improve the mango's production value chain.

Under contracts signed more than two years ago, Dong Thap exported 100 to 200 tons of mango each month to Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong (China), and New Zealand.

Tran Van Ha, from the University of Can Tho, advised Dong Thap to foster connectivity among farmers and between farmers and businesses to boost production, one of the key pillars of the province's agricultural restructuring strategy.

Meanwhile, Nguyen Bao Ve, the former director of the Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Can Tho, said that the province should manage the maintenance of this fruit tree to improve the quality of mango, while concentrating on diversifying products to meet the demands of the market.


Source: VNA via www.freshplaza.com

Publication date: 7/3/2018

Vietnam: UNIDO promotes post-harvest excellence for mangoes

Mekong River Delta


The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Vietnamese Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) and the People’s Committee of the Dong Thap province invited over 120 high-level participants from the public and private sector to discuss opportunities to strengthen the mango value chain, and to build a modern mango export system for Vietnam.

With a total area of 43,000 hectares and an output of 500,000 tons per year, mango is one of the key fruit trees in, and one of the main income sources of the Mekong Delta with high international potential in markets such as China, Japan, Korea and Russia. However, at 27 per cent, the post-harvest loss rate is very high.

Karl Schebesta from UNIDO introduced the Centre of Excellence approach to strengthen the mango value chain: “The centre offers appropriate models and upgraded technologies to improve the quality of agricultural products; to reduce post-harvest losses; and to improve the organizational and managerial production structure in rural areas.”

Located in the city of Cao Lanh in the Dong Thap province, the centre was set-up in close cooperation with Kim Nhung Company to also serve as a model for replication and upscaling. By working with the centre, the company improved its capacity from 15 - 20 tons per day to 60 tons per day. At the same time, the post-harvest loss rate at over 300 participating farms reduced to 50, 30 and now 15 per cent.

“All these are key elements allowing to increase the income while improving the livelihood of small-holder farmers and their families,” MARD’s Nguyen Minh Tien told europeansting.com, adding: “This proves that applying proper post-harvest technology along the value chain is the solution, which can be scaled-up and applied to other agro value chains, also in other provinces of Vietnam.”

Publication date: 6/26/2018

Source: www.freshplaza.com

Vietnamese lychee hubs to start picking main crop

Lychee growers in the two lychee farming hubs of Vietnam (Bac Giang and Hai Duong provinces), are currently busy with harvesting this season's first crop of lychees. They are also preparing for picking the lychees of the fast-approaching main crop scheduled for the next five days.

By June 5, the lychee growing areas in the northern province of Bac Giang are entering the end of the early maturing fruit crop and are in preparation for harvesting the main crop. The province is expected to harvest 150,000-180,000 tons of lychees this season, the highest volume of the past few years. This is mainly due to the favourable climate and the acceleration of the application of technology in farming in accordance with VietGAP and GlobalGAP standards.

The quality and shape of the lychees are considered as the best in the past 10 years. The entire province of Bac Giang is estimated to sell approximately 9,000 tons of lychees by June 3, with a total value of $7.48 million.

Meanwhile, in the lychee farming hub of Hai Duong, Thanh Ha lychees are labelled with QR code stamps and all growing areas that meet the VietGAP and GlobalGAP standards will also be labelled with QR codes in order to trace the origins of the fruit. QR code labels are an essential requirement for Vietnamese lychees if they are to be exported to China through the Guangxi border in 2018.

According to the Hai Duong provincial Trade Promotion Centre, lychees tagged with QR codes are valued by consumers, particularly those in large cities and they are also at least 10% more expensive than those without a QR code.

According to en.nhandan.org.vn, the good news for lychee growers is that the Red Dragon Company successfully shipped 1.2 tons of early maturing lychees to Australia on March 28, which was the first batch of Hai Duong lychees to be exported to Australia. The company also plans to export more to Australia in addition to the EU and the Middle East.

Publication date: 6/7/2018

Source: www.freshplaza.com 

AHEIA working with Vietnamese trade delegation

AHEIA's Dominic Jenkin participated in a working lunch hosted by Viet Kong Bank, at which cooperation in horticultural trade was discussed as an important opportunity to increase trade between Australia and Vietnam. Bilateral trade allows mutual support of both countries.

AHEIA is currently working on an ATMAC project - Agricultural Trade and Market Access Cooperation program, a grant from the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, to address supply chain issues.